Showing posts with label Kosher. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Kosher. Show all posts

May 12, 2019

Pu Pu Platter @David Chu's

Celebrated Mother's Day today @David Chu's in Baltimore. 

In addition to my favorite, Sesame Chicken, Dossy ordered the Pu Pu Platter. 

2 BBQ Ribs
2 Teriyaki Beef
2 Spring Rolls
2 Frieds Won Tons
2 Chicken Toast

(Thankfully, there was no poo in the pu pu!)

All this Kosher Chinese food, had me craving a Coca Cola afterwards like it always does. 

Then we stopped at Market Maven, which replaced Seasons that went bankrupted last year. 

Overall, a nice family day that I am so grateful for to Hashem!  ;-)

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)
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January 24, 2019

Take Your Head Out of My Shopping Cart

So this was funny today at Harris Teeter. 

I'm checking out on the express line with a few things. 

First some tofu.

The lady at the cash register goes:
Hmm.  Healthy!

Then some Meal Mart Buffalo Style Chicken Wings.

Again, the lady at the cash register comments:
Have you tried that?  Is it good?  It looks good!

Politely, I replied:
Yes, they are really good.

At the same time I was feeing smart-alecy, like what the heck, should I open the package on the conveyer belt and let you taste one--right here, right now.   

Sure privacy is a big issue when it comes to technology, social media, and all sorts of surveillance these days

But even when one simply goes to the grocery store--there is the very basic privacy about what one is buying. 

Yes, I see people looking into my cart, with eyebrows raised eyeing my goodies.  I can hear them thinking:
What is he buying?  Is it marked Kosher? (Uh, actually it is!]  That doesn't seem like a balanced diet!

Another time, the checkout person asked me when I was buying a bunch of something:
Oh, are you having a party? What's the occasion?

While I appreciate the good-natured banter and people being friendly, it seems more than weird in a way to be discussing what I'm buying, why, and for whom.  

Not quite Big Brother, but maybe that's the leftover small town feel in our lonely urban and high-tech living.  ;-)

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)
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January 16, 2019

Green Eggs and Ham - דוקטור סוס

So who would've thought that Dr. Seuss's "Green Eggs and Ham" comes in Hebrew. 

I watched this video, and loved it!

It is amazing that this can translate over.

One critique that I have is that the book should've said that the main character didn't want to eat the green eggs and ham, because he is kosher (instead of not being hungry or not loving the food).  

But then again, he would've had to stick to his guns and not have eaten it in the end! 

One other thing that I learned from this video/book, is that even though I am loving learning Hebrew in Ulpan class, I still have the vocabulary of a 9 year old.  LOL

But I'm learning... ;-)

(Thank you to my daughter, Rebecca for sharing this with me.)
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November 25, 2018

Who Is More Religious?

Please see my new article in The Times of Israel called, "Being Super Duper Kosher."
Of course, I am sure many good people are trying to do the right thing and genuinely practice to be better servants of Hashem. However, this should never become an excuse to use religious practices to misguidedly “compete”–hurt or shame–and somehow “one up” their neighbor’s religiosity or status as fellow Jews. That would be to erroneously think that G-d can’t see all His children as good and deserving in their own ways, even though the creator can certainly see what is in the heart and in the doings of all of us.

Hope this resonates with many of you who are kosher but feel unfairly (mis)judged by all the latest variations these days. ;-)

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)
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April 1, 2018

Worst Passover Cake Ever

So this has got to be the worst Passover cake ever. 

It's definitely not kosher for Pesach. 

Not only is it made from chametz, but it's shaped like a chazer (i.e. pig) too.

This thing would be conceptually treyf even on the best of non-Passover days. 

Does it have lard too? 

I don't know for sure, but would it really be a pig cake if it didn't!

This lousy cake doesn't even have an ounce of chocolate in it--have you ever heard of a genuine dessert that tastes like the calorie count it adds up to be without chocolate? 

I've heard of the callous calling people a pig for eating too much cake and being fat, but making the oink oink face directly on the cake itself--and on Passover--is not only insulting, but at $28.95, it's overpriced too. ;-)

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)
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March 20, 2018

Fortune Cookie Generator

Ok, this is a most interesting fortune cookie:
"If your cookie still in one piece, buy lotto."

Hmm, what cookie is this referring to?  And why should I buy lotto?

So I start to think that this is likely a computer-generated garbage fortune--i.e. the artificial intelligence makes no f*ckin sense! 

Anyway, you will be fascinated to know that the modern fortune cookie with the paper fortune inside the hollow of the cookie was invented in California.

However, the Japanese put something like this in the bend of the cookie already in the 19th century. 

Using this fortune as an example, I have this gnawing feeling that the Japanese fortunes had a lot more intellectual substance to them. 

Anyway, someone tell this lame cookie fortune teller that Lotto is way out and Powerball is in and where the real winnings are. ;-)

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)
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January 13, 2018

Honey Chicken Delicious

Just wanted to share this amazing honey chicken. 

Yes, I know you can't eat it, but you can imagine what it tastes like.

Had this at L'Chaim Asian Cuisine and Steak House in Hollywood, Florida. 

Absolutely to die for!

That was a lot of honey over the dark crispy chicken. 

It's been a few months and I still haven't been able to get it out of my mind. 

That is quite a recommendation I would say. 

See you there! ;-)

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)
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March 4, 2017

Kosher Trust Or Not

Here's the big controversy in our synagogue this week. 

The Rabbi is having a Purim open house and he invited everyone to bring a pot luck.

"Only home-made food, no purchased food please!"

In Jewish circles, this is the opposite of what you'd expect, where checking the kosher labels and symbols is critical to ensuring the food has followed the strict kosher dietary laws and can be eaten. 

Yet as pointed out, kashrut has been made into a whole commercial business these days...does it still reflect the intent?

The Rabbi explained in services today, in a very well received way, that we need to get back to respecting and trusting each other. 

That these values are essential to being truly religious people.

It was a wonderful speech in that it evoked unconditional acceptance and respect for everyone. 

As we know, no one is so perfect, even though the goal of course is to be as perfect as we can be. 

So two things:

1) I really like the notion of treating people well and putting that high on the priorities as we are all G-d's creatures.

2) I myself am kosher, but not fanatically so, therefore, I personally appreciated the acceptance and love in the community. 

Yet, after I got home, and thinking about this some more, and despite my own failings religiously and otherwise, I asked myself, "Am I really comfortable eating from a parve and meat community pot luck?"

And even as I ask this question, I am sort of squirming at the idea of just eating anyone's food--and not knowing anything about it. 

How am I doing due diligence in even trying to keep kosher like that?

While maybe I'm not the most kosher of everyone, it certainly is important to me to at least try (to some extent), but I ask myself can this be considered really even trying--when some people aren't religious, may not have a strong religious education, and perhaps some may not even be (fully) Jewish?

Sure, someone can even have the best intentions and try to bring kosher food, yet it's certainly possible that the food may not be kosher. 

Perhaps, in prior times, it was an issue of more or less kosher, but these days, it can be an issue of kosher or not kosher at all. 

This is a very difficult issue--because we can't put people up against the law--we must by necessity respect both. 

So yes, I love the idea of respecting everyone and that's a given assuming they are good, decent people, but trust is not something you just have, it's something you earn, by...being trustful!

I'm not one to preach religion to anyone...I struggle myself with the laws and in trying to do what's right in the commandments between man and G-d. 

And while I am ready to accept all good and loving people, I am perhaps not ready to just trust them without knowing that the trust is dutiful. 

Love thy neighbor as thyself is paramount, but also we have a duty to G-d to try to fulfill his commandments the best we can. ;-)

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)
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December 31, 2016

Nourishment For The Soul

So the Rabbi , a Kabbalist of mystical Torah interpretation, told my wife to concentrate on 3 commandments.

1) Shabbat
2) Kosher
3) Going to Synagogue

Today, we had a little delay and almost didn't make it to synagogue, but my wife said, "Remember what the Kabbalist said about going every week," so we went even though we were a little late. 

We went to a conservative synagogue today called, B'nai Israel, in Rockville - it was our second time there. 

The services there are so orchestrated down to the tiniest of details...you could tell that a lot of thought, planning, and effort goes into every service. 

I was really impressed at how meticulous they were for example: 

- Explaining everything and even handing out the sources to their Shabbat speech

- Having everyone ready for their part of the service whether leading the prayers, reading the Torah, or making the blessings over the wine and bread (which was already on a cart on the bimah--alter)

- Including a women who read the weekly Torah portion, children who led some of the prayers, an elderly lady who spoke about upcoming events for the Seniors group, and they even sang Hanukah songs in everything from Ladino to Yiddish.  

At the end of the service, we spoke briefly to the Rabbi and thanked him for such a "perfect service," and my wife commented how he had such a cool radio voice when he leads the congregation (and he really does..like JM (jewish music) in the AM).

After service, I told my wife how happy I was that we made it to synagogue, that is was like nourishment to my spirit and soul for the week.

We have to feed ourselves physically as well as intellectually, emotionally, socially, and of course spiritually.  

Like the fingers on our hand...we need them all to hold unto life itself. ;-)

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

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September 1, 2016

Great New Kosher Food In Washington DC


So nice to meet this impressive young Jewish women today, Carly. 

A Sophomore at GW University, who had the brainchild for more and better kosher food options in Washington, D.C. 

Hence, Brooklyn Sandwich Company food truck. 

The kids are lining up for their whole brisket sandwiches on a pretzel bun with broccoli slaw and many other kosher sandwich and soup treats. 

This is awesome opportunity for some terrific kosher food in America's capital. 

Great job to Carly and Rabbi Yudi Steiner!  ;-)

(Source Video: Andy Blumenthal)
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May 25, 2016

(Re)Kashering The Kitchen

So with all the 613s that we and are our friends and family are seeing, we are taking these as a sign and important message. 

Yesterday, I posted that I would show you today how it is personally affecting us.

So one of the things that we are doing is (re)kashering our kitchen. 

New and separate dishes and cooking utensils for meat and dairy meals.  

We got these beautiful French Perle Lenox in gorgeous lilac and ice blue (of course, no one better actually use one and break it). 

Being more a part of the synagogue and community now, we are hoping to host more people for Shabbat etc.

There are other small (and large) ways that we are coming back to more of our traditions, but we are far from perfect. 

Sort of a blend of the secular world, the religious one, and just being ourselves. 

But that is our road, and we strive to do better in all aspects of our lives and pray for G-d's mercy and blessings all along the way and at the destination. ;-)

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)
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April 17, 2016

Japanese Cuisine Through Sheltered Eyes

So I had my first Miso Soup today.

Actually, I shared it with my wife who checked that the stock was kosher--the lady said bonito--and my wife said, good. 

I'm a Jewish kid from the Bronx--what do I know from Miso Soup. 

So about the only thing that I can tell you about the soup is what a fishy taste!

I know it's supposed to be really good for you--and that's why I even tried it. 

But the closest thing that I can compare it to is the when my mom used to boil the wrapped gefilte fish in water before Shabbat--well the leftover water that gets discarded--that's what in my imagination Miso Soup tasted like. 

Would I get it again? 

Let's just say, I wouldn't run to get it--however, for good health, I may hold my taste buds and sense of smell of all the fishy stuff in abeyance, and just drink in down.

In general though, I really like some Asian cuisine--for example, with vegetarian dishes things like Kung Po Tofu and Mo-Po Tofu or Crispy Eggplant and Vegetables in Fried Rice. 

The other thing I really like is the innovative Japanese Ramune "marble soda" in which you push out a real marble from the spout into the bottle and it rolls around inside while you drink the refreshing fruity flavors (don't worry, it's not as dangerous as it sounds). 

Last thing, I'll mention is that I won't eat sushi--raw fish seems like it's primed to give you a nice big stomach ache--now this reminds me of another type of dish in Jewish tradition and that's herring (often served with cream sauce) and prominent at many a Ashkenazi kiddush served after synagogue services. 

With the Sushi, if they can somehow manage to cook it for me and use kosher fish, okay--otherwise, I'm heading to the nearest Chinese Kosher Restaurant for some nice Sesame, Kung Pao, Moo Shu, or Lo Mein with Beef or Chicken. ;-)

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)
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March 6, 2016

Oh Those Crispy Wontons

These were some good-looking crispy wonton chips at the Kosher Chinese. 

But I was good, and didn't have a single one!

Dossy was lucky and could have some and she put soy sauce on hers.

It was tempting, but I held strong.

Carbohydrates = Poison. 

Carbohydrates = Poison. 

Carbohydrates = Poison. 

I tell myself over and over.

Do NOT touch. 

Do NOT eat.

Do NOT even go near them. 

Not so bad...mind over matter. 

If you don't mind, it doesn't matter. 

Willpower, plain and simple. 

Would be easier perhaps with some different "food" genetics. 

But grateful for every blessing G-d has bestowed. ;-)

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)
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February 13, 2016

A Last Act Of Giving

So after the Rabbi's speech today on the Halachic Organ Donor Society, I joined up to be a donor. 

I had always believed this was the right thing to do, but knowing that there is a kosher way to do it, sealed the cause for me. 

There are more than 123,000 Americans that need lifesaving organ transplants and every 10 minutes another name is added to the national organ transplant waiting list, so if I don't need mine any more, I'd like to help someone that does. 

While ideally, I would like to return my body to  G-d in pristine condition the same way that I received it, I realize that life wears away at us and moreover, sometimes tragedy (G-d forbid) strikes. 

Of course, I hope and pray for a long and healthy life, but if we are in a position to help, how can we not be there for those who need us in one last giving moment. ;-)

(Source Photo of Photo: Andy Blumenthal)
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September 4, 2015

Feeling So Naughty

Ok, so Dossy brought home a new snack.

It's from Trader Joe's and it's called Baconesque.

It's popcorn with white cheddar and bacon-like seasoning...it's Kosher (OU, Dairy)!

The sidebar from the man and lady dancing on the packaging says, "I can't believe it's not bacon!" and I'm thinking I can't believe it's just like bacon!

So I tear open the package, and dug in for my first taste of bacon-like popcorn (note: except for imitation bacon bites which my sister used to put on salads, I've never tasted bacon or anything like it). 

One handful, two handful...almost puking now. 

Yeah, it tastes like I thought it would, but maybe Jews know a little something too...I like a good piece of beef better, much much better.  ;-)

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)
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May 25, 2015

The Chalkboard Car

This is a photo of a chalkboard car. 

And on the hood is written "Happy Memorial Day!"

On the side was a design in chalk and on the back even a peace sign. 

Wouldn't it be sort of funny if everyone had a car with handwritten messages on it (as long as they were kept clean and non-aggressive). 

A little entertainment, humor, how ya feeling today, and more. 

It's also nice when we don't take ourselves so seriously and can just have some kosher fun in life. ;-)

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)
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December 22, 2014

No Soup For You!

Remember the "Soup Nazi" in Seinfeld?

After some silly insulting encounter, the Soup Nazi refuses to give Jerry any soup saying in his deep accent, "No soup for you."

Well, when I walked in the local pizza store and saw this sign on the counter, I couldn't help but laugh a little.

It's the real thing...and it says, "Sorry No Soups Tonight."

And it's sort of sloppily written on a guest check and placed in a Coca Cola holder. 

I wasn't too disappointed with the news though, since who gets the soup at a pizza joint anyway?  ;-)

(Source Photo: Dannielle Blumenthal)
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October 15, 2014

Want to Ride The Falafel Bus?

Falafel is a funny sounding food, but actually tastes pretty good. 

The best that I've ever had was in Tel Aviv with spicy falafel balls, hot french fries, and loads of creamy Tehina stuffed in the pita.

Only thing better is with juicy grilled schwarma, right off the rotating fire spit, and hot sauce, and for that try Max's in Silver Spring. 

One of my friends used to joke about the guy with an accent selling falafel, but who used to ring out (what sounded like), "Pizza and Palapel!" 

In terms of getting it from a curbside bus--only if it is hot and kosher. ;-)

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)
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April 6, 2014

New York Deli Bread


No it's not my diet, just my impromptu spoofing of a song by Awkwafina. 

We took a hike to the local Kosher deli and it just sort of happened. 

Enjoying a beautiful, sunny Spring day and got a little inspired to try my hand at something new and fun. ;-) 
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April 4, 2014

For The Love Of Animals

I read this incredible story in the Jerusalem Post about Denmark prohibiting Shechita (the Jewish kosher way to slaughter animals for food). 

What is amazing about this is:


1) Shechita is known as one of the most humane ways to slaughter animals for food. It involves a single rapid uninterrupted stroke across the throat with a super sharp knife. One of the reasons this method is used is precisely so that the animal does not feel any pain. This is unlike other common practices for slaughtering animals which include clubbing, electrifying, shooting, suffocation, and more. 


2) Denmark while prohibiting Shechita, permits bestiality/Zoophilia (human sex with animals). So bestiality, a very pagan-like practice, is legal in Denmark, even though it is prohibited under the penalty of death (for the person and the animal) in the Bible


So animal rape is okay in Denmark. And Judeo Christian laws and beliefs are not, especially when they actually protect the animals. Uh, something is rotten in the barn here. Or put another way:


Animals in the bedroom--Oh, no, no, no.

Animals ritually slaughtered for dinner--moo, moo, moo.  ;-)


(Source Photo: here with attribution to Ed Schipul)

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