Showing posts with label SOAP. Show all posts
Showing posts with label SOAP. Show all posts

September 8, 2020

Laundry is a Colorful Cleaning Affair

It's great when laundry goes from smelly and dirty to fresh and clean!

Some nice refreshing laundry detergent is just what's needed. 

When the detergent comes in big, bright bottles like here, then it's even a more inviting experience. 

Clean laundry, clean mind, clean mouth way to go! ;-)

(Credit Photo: Andy Blumenthal)
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November 19, 2019

Pool Poop Galore

So I was at the pool going swimming, doing my laps.  

It was very busy there with lots of people of all ages. 

All of a sudden, I hear some screaming. 

Then the guards come over and tell people they have to get out of the pool, pronto!

There's been an accident. 

No, not someone getting hurt.

Someone had a bathroom accident in the pool.

The director of the pool is going around explaining to the inconvenienced swimmers that:
"Someone pooped in the pool."

Not exactly an eloquent way to say it, but it gets the point across. 

What is worse, it was on the side of the pool where the adults were swimming!

Next come the lifeguards with the nets and they are literally scooping swathes of this sh*t out of the pool. 

I see it literally spans almost a half length of this olympic pool. 

What a crappin' mess. 

Luckily I got almost all my swim in--yes, I am dedicated!

And then took a long hot shower with tons and tons of soap. ;-)

(Credit Photo: Andy Blumenthal)
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July 2, 2013

Dirty Little People

Popular Science had some scary germy statistics about how few people wash their hands well when coming out of the bathroom.

Take a guess?

Only 5%!

And that's based on almost 4,000 people they observed--but how many would've washed correctly if they thought no one was watching?

The dirty stats (while under observation):

- 23% didn't use soap.

- 15% of men and 7% of women didn't even use water.

- Average washed for just 6 seconds! (CDC says you need at least 20 seconds with soap and water to kill germs)

From what I've seen, unless their is a touchless water faucet and automatic towel dispenser, not too many people wash their hands--they don't want to get them dirty by touching the same bathroom devices that the other people just touched.

Another no-no for people is touching the bathroom door handle--more germs!

What do some people do--they use (wads of) toilet seat protectors to pull the door open--then guess what's missing for the next guy or gal?

Most public bathrooms are disgusting--if everyone could just have their own, they would keep it clean out of self-interest and maybe wash their hands a little more too. 

Next time we have a recession and need to invest in "shovel ready" infrastructure projects to keep America working--how about we build some (read lots!) clean bathrooms and throw in the automatic wash features, pretty please. ;-)

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)


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June 6, 2008

Information Sharing Standards and Enterprise Architecture

In response to the 9/11 Commission’s recommendations, the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act (IRTPA) of 2004 called for an Information Sharing Environment (ISE), “an approach that facilitates the sharing of terrorism information” and that requires the President to designate a Program Manager for the ISE and to establish an Information Sharing Council to advise the President and the Program Manager.

The Common Terrorism Information Sharing Standards (CTISS) Program Manual is a construct for ISE. It defines both functional standards and technical standards.

  • Functional standards—According to the CTISS Program Manual, these are “detailed mission descriptions, data and metadata on focused areas that use ISE business processes and information flows to share information.” From an enterprise architecture perspective, I believe this would correspond to the business and information perspectives of the architecture as well as be extended probably to the performance perspective. In other words, functional standards correlate to the three business perspectives of the Federal Enterprise Architecture. These are the standards that define our requirements, in other words, how we measure performance (for example, Balanced Scorecard), how we engineer business processes (for example, Lean Six Sigma), and how we describe information sharing requirements (for example, NIEM or U-CORE, and Information Exchange Package Descriptions).
  • Technical Standards—“methods and techniques to implement information sharing capability…[for] acquiring, accessing, producing, retaining, protecting, and sharing.” From an enterprise architecture perspective, I believe this would correspond to the services, technology, and security perspectives of the architecture. These correlate to the three technical perspectives of the architecture. The technical standards include how systems will interoperate or share information (for example, J2EE, .NET), what technology standards will be employed (for example, XML, SOAP, UDDI) and how security will be assured (for example, various from NIST/FIPS, ISO, IEEE, and so on).

What I like about the CTISS is that it attempts to define a comprehensive framework for the ISE from the highest-level being the domains of information (such as intelligence, law enforcement, homeland security, foreign affairs, and defense) and drills down to the security domains (SBU, Secret, and US-SCI), reference models, (FEA, DoDAF, IC EA…), standard types (metadata, data, exchange, and service), standards bodies (NIEM, W3C, OASIS…), and then the standards themselves.

As an initial impression, I think next steps are to articulate how I share information with you or you share with me. Currently, we are still defining techniques for future sharing of data, like developing metadata, creating a data dictionary and schema, defining exchange standards, and service standards to discover data through registries. It like responding to someone who asks, how do I get to your house, by saying, we need to pave roads, design and manufacture cars or buses, install traffic signs and lights, and so on. That’s all infrastructure that needs to be built. That still doesn’t tell me how I get to your house. While we are making huge progress with information sharing, we’re still at the early stages of figuring out what the infrastructure elements are to share. But it seems to be a running start!


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